Fixed-fee leasehold conveyancing in Charing Cross:

Whether you are buying or selling leasehold flat in Charing Cross, our panel of leasehold conveyancing experts will help you move with as little stress as possible. Find a Charing Cross conveyancing lawyer with our search tool

Charing Cross leasehold conveyancing: Q and A’s

I am in need of some leasehold conveyancing in Charing Cross. Before I get started I would like to find out the remaining lease term.

If the lease is registered - and most are in Charing Cross - then the leasehold title will always include the short particulars of the lease, namely the date; the term; and the original parties. From a conveyancing perspective such details then enable any prospective buyer and lender to confirm that any lease they are looking at is the one relevant to that title.For any other purpose, such as confirming how long the term was granted for and calculating what is left, then the register should be sufficient on it's own.

My fiance and I may need to sub-let our Charing Cross garden flat for a while due to a career opportunity. We used a Charing Cross conveyancing practice in 2001 but they have closed and we did not think at the time get any advice as to whether the lease permits subletting. How do we find out?

A small minority of properties in Charing Cross do contain a provision to say that subletting is only permitted with prior consent from the landlord. The landlord is not entitled to unreasonably withhold but, in such cases, they would need to see references. Experience dictates that problems are usually caused by unsatisfactory tenants rather than owner-occupiers and for that reason you can expect the freeholder to take up the references and consider them carefully before granting consent.

Due to exchange soon on a studio apartment in Charing Cross. Conveyancing lawyers assured me that they report fully next week. Are there areas in the report that I should be focusing on?

Your report on title for your leasehold conveyancing in Charing Cross should include some of the following:

  • The total extent of the property. This will be the flat itself but could also incorporate a roof space or cellar if applicable.
  • Ground rent - how much and when you need to pay, and also know whether this is subject to change
  • An explanation as to the provision in the lease to pay service charges - with regard to both the building, and the more general rights a leaseholder has
  • Repair and maintenance of the flat
  • The landlord’s rights to access the flat you be made aware that your landlord has rights of access and I know how much notice s/he must provide.
  • Responsibility for repairing the window frames
  • What the implications are if you breach a clause of your lease? For details of the information to be contained in your report on your leasehold property in Charing Cross please ask your solicitor in ahead of your conveyancing in Charing Cross

  • I own a leasehold flat in Charing Cross. Conveyancing and Aldermore mortgage went though with no issue. A letter has just been received from someone claiming to own the freehold. It included a ground rent demand for rent dating back to 1991. The conveyancing practitioner in Charing Cross who acted for me is not around.What should I do?

    The first thing you should do is contact the Land Registry to be sure that the individual purporting to own the freehold is indeed the new freeholder. You do not need to instruct a Charing Cross conveyancing firm to do this as you can do this on the Land Registry website for less than a fiver. You should note that in any event, even if this is the legitimate freeholder, under the Limitation Act 1980 the limitation period for recovery of ground rent is six years.

    Do you have any advice for leasehold conveyancing in Charing Cross from the point of view of saving time on the sale process?

    • Much of the delay in leasehold conveyancing in Charing Cross can be bypassed if you instruct lawyers the minute your agents start advertising the property and request that they start to collate the leasehold information which will be required by the purchasers’ lawyers.
    • In the event that you altered the property did you need the Landlord’s permission? In particular have you installed wooden flooring? Charing Cross leases often stipulate that internal structural changes or laying down wooden flooring calls for a licence issued by the Landlord consenting to such changes. If you fail to have the approvals in place you should not communicate with the landlord without contacting your conveyancer in the first instance.
  • If there is a history of any disputes with your landlord or managing agents it is very important that these are resolved prior to the flat being marketed. The buyers and their solicitors will be concerned about purchasing a flat where there is a current dispute. You may need to swallow your pride and pay any arrears of service charge or resolve the dispute prior to completion of the sale. It is therefore preferable to have any dispute settled prior to the contract papers being issued to the buyers’ solicitors. You will still have to reveal particulars of the dispute to the buyers, but it is better to reveal the dispute as historic rather than ongoing.
  • If you have the benefit of shareholding in the Management Company, you should ensure that you have the original share document. Organising a re-issued share certificate is often a lengthy formality and delays many a Charing Cross conveyancing transaction. Where a new share certificate is needed, do contact the company officers or managing agents (where applicable) for this at the earliest opportunity.
  • You believe that you know the number of years left on your lease but it would be wise to verify this by asking your conveyancers. A buyer’s conveyancer will not be happy to advise their client to proceed with the purchase of a leasehold property the lease term is below 75 years. In the circumstances it is essential at an early stage that you consider whether the lease term requires a lease extension. If it does, contact your solicitors before you put your premises on the market for sale.

  • I have had difficulty in negotiating a lease extension in Charing Cross. Can this matter be resolved via the Leasehold Valuation Tribunal?

    You certainly can. We are happy to put you in touch with a Charing Cross conveyancing firm who can help.

    An example of a Freehold Enfranchisement decision for a Charing Cross flat is 20 Avonwick Road in July 2013. The Tribunal was dealing with an application under Section 26 of the Leasehold Reform Housing and Urban Development Act 1993 for a determination of the freehold value of the property. It was concluded that the price to be paid was Fifteen Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy (£15,970) divided as to £8,200 for Flat 20 and £7,770 for Flat 20A This case was in relation to 1 flat. The the number of years remaining on the existing lease(s) was 73.26 years.

    Other Topics

    Lease Extensions in Charing Cross